Donald Trump Wants the Disability Vote – Don’t Give it to Him

Donald Trump Wants the Disability Vote – Don’t Give it to Him

Late last night, Senator Ted Cruz ended his campaign for the Presidency. While Cruz himself was by no means suited to be President, his departure from the race makes something that would have been unbelievable a year ago a certainty: Donald J. Trump will become the Republican nominee for President of the United States.

Even the once formidable Republican Establishment is rallying around Trump. Shortly after the results of the Indiana primary were announced, the chair of the Republican National Committee, Reince Priebus, tweeted his support and called for the party to unite behind a man who has built his campaign on the rawest kind of hatred, prejudice and xenophobia.  Ari Fleischer, George W. Bush’s Press Secretary, tweeted his support for Trump only two months after condemning his refusal to denounce David Duke and the Klu Klux Klan.

How did we get here? Many are asking that question, and better minds than mine have put forward a wide array of theories. But there’ll be plenty of time later on to try and figure out how a vulgar reality television star who built his candidacy on the most outrageous sort of lies and authoritarianism became a major party nominee for President. Now, our focus must shift to ensuring that he does not win the general election.

Because make no mistake: Trump is dangerous, and while the smart money remains that the Republican party that was foolish enough to select him will lose by historic margins in November, we underestimate him at our peril. He is cunning, shameless and extraordinarily talented at becoming whatever it takes to win. People underestimating Donald Trump is what got him this far. Those of us who see what a disaster Trump would be for the United States of America and the world need to not make that mistake.

At times like this, it’s incumbent upon every reasonable person to do their part. We all have to speak out, to whatever small section of the electorate listens to us, about the danger that Mr. Trump poses to the American republic. Others will speak about how Trump threatens racial and religious minorities, democratic norms, journalistic freedom, basic standards of human rights, long-standing American commitments to our allies abroad and much, much else. As a lifelong disability rights advocate, my role is to speak – solely in the capacity of a concerned citizen – as to how Trump threatens the disability community.

It’s a more important task than many people realize, in part because people with disabilities have not been the main target of Trump’s demagoguery. Despite a reprehensible episode last year where Trump engaged in a cartoonish mockery of a journalist’s physical disability, the bulk of Trump’s attention has not been on the disability community. And this is exactly the danger. To those of us who have been watching closely, there is significant evidence that Trump is likely to make a play for the disability vote before the general election is over.

Already, his campaign has tried to reach out to parents of autistic children who buy into the long discredited myth that autism is caused by vaccinations. As far back as the second Republican primary debate, Trump linked autism to vaccines, going on to spout the long discredited idea that “autism has become an epidemic…Twenty-five years ago, 35 years ago, you look at the statistics, not even close. It has gotten totally out of control.” Never mind the overwhelming scientific consensus against vaccine causation of autism, or the significant evidence that shows that autism has always existed in the general population at comparable rates to the modern day. Never mind the despicable premise that subjecting children to the risk of death from fatal illness is preferable to even a fake risk of having an autistic child. Trump saw an electoral opportunity, and he took it.

With some results, it must be said. Just this past month, Bob Wright, the founder of Autism Speaks, tweeted his enthusiastic support for Trump. Since then, former Autism Speaks executive and failed Republican congressional candidate Elizabeth Emken joined the Trump campaign as a spokesperson, appearing on national television to defend Trump’s comments and claim the vaccine issue was still an open question. Trump has become the enthusiastic candidate of anti-vax parents, receiving endorsement from several blogs associated with the anti-vaccine wing of the autism parent movement.

Trump has also made symbolic gestures towards the veteran community, which includes a significant number of people with disabilities. While these have generally been rejected by the more respectable veterans organizations, he’s doing so because he sees an opportunity and a need. Having nearly won the Republican nomination by showcasing his willingness to trample upon those sectors of society that are weaker than he is, he knows that in order to win a general election he will need a fig leaf. An image as a candidate that stands up for disabled children and wounded warriors is a useful one to project. Every credit he gets in that column will help offset his reputation as a bully displaying his machismo by attacking immigrants, minorities and women. It’s important to deny him that opportunity.

The truth is simple: Donald Trump has an abysmal set of policy positions when it comes to disability. Nowhere is this more clear than in his own campaign website’s policy statement on health care. Here are four areas where even Trump’s meager written statements on policy issues threaten to make things worse for people with disabilities:

Donald Trump will Bring Back Health Insurers Discriminating Against People with Disabilities

“Completely repeal Obamacare. Our elected representatives must eliminate the individual mandate. No person should be required to buy insurance unless he or she wants to.”

When the Americans with Disabilities Act passed in 1990, people with disabilities were protected from most forms of discrimination – with one notable exception: insurance markets. From 1990 to 2014, when the Affordable Care Act came into full implementation, disabled Americans could be denied access to insurance coverage or charged exorbitant rates above the non-disabled population in order to access health insurance. The ACA changed that, banning pre-existing condition discrimination and requiring insurers to serve all who sought their services.

Early in the Republican primary, Trump claimed to want to protect people with pre-existing conditions from continued discrimination. But his health plan includes no such provision to do so – and promises to completely repeal the Affordable Care Act. What’s worse is Trump’s promise to eliminate the ACA’s mandate that individuals buy health insurance. While unpopular, the individual mandate is the only realistic way to make a ban on insurers discriminating against people with disabilities and other pre-existing conditions viable. The House Republican leadership knows this – which is why Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has recently called for bringing back pre-existing condition discrimination in the Republican alternative to the Affordable Care Act.

What the individual mandate – and the use of pre-existing condition discrimination before it – is designed to do is simple: ensure that people don’t wait till they’re already sick to buy insurance. Without it, the health insurance model doesn’t work. Insurance depends on large numbers of healthy, non-disabled people paying premiums against the risk of future illness. By planning to repeal the ACA, Trump shows that he will not keep in place President Obama’s policies protecting people with disabilities from discrimination in the insurance market. By promising to eliminate the individual mandate, Trump proves that he will provide no new such policy himself.

Donald Trump Proposes a Race to the Bottom in Commercial Insurance Benefits

“Modify existing law that inhibits the sale of health insurance across state lines. As long as the plan purchased complies with state requirements, any vendor ought to be able to offer insurance in any state. By allowing full competition in this market, insurance costs will go down and consumer satisfaction will go up.”

Allowing the sale of insurance across state lines is a pleasant-sounding policy idea that’s been rattling around conservative healthcare talking points for years now. It seems superficially positive – after all, increasing competition between insurance providers should serve to reduce prices. Unfortunately, the reality of this proposal would be to set off a race to the bottom for insurers to offer the least comprehensive benefit package possible.

Conservative commentators support the sale of insurance across states lines mainly because it would effectively render impossible meaningful state regulation over insurer benefit packages. State laws requiring insurers to cover particular benefits, like occupational therapy, pregnancy coverage, assistive technology or other health care services or devices would be rendered effectively meaningless by this proposal.

States which maintained these laws would only have their insurance purchased by those who required the benefit – leading to financial insolvency on the part of state health plans. (Once again, the fundamental premise of insurance requires some people to purchase plans that include benefits they don’t yet need and may never need.) Instead, the last plans standing would be those based out of states that allowed for cut-rate, minimal coverage, insufficient to meet the needs of children or adults with disabilities.

Such an approach would force millions of adults with disabilities and families with children with disabilities to limit their work effort in order to qualify for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Ironically, one of the only things that could prevent such a negative trend is…the Affordable Care Act, which allows the federal government to set basic standards for what insurers must cover that apply nationally.

Donald Trump Promises to Devastate the Medicaid Program which Funds Most Disability Services

“Block-grant Medicaid to the states. Nearly every state already offers benefits beyond what is required in the current Medicaid structure. The state governments know their people best and can manage the administration of Medicaid far better without federal overhead. States will have the incentives to seek out and eliminate fraud, waste and abuse to preserve our precious resources.”

Once again, block-granting Medicaid to the states is a longstanding right-wing policy proposal. Currently, Medicaid works as a partnership between the state and the federal government. For every dollar that a state Medicaid program is willing to commit, the federal government will match it with a dollar of their own (and in most cases much more than a dollar, as the federal match rate is calculated based on the level of poverty within the state – poor states get more federal money). That means that as a state’s commitment increases, so does the federal governments.

This match is critical to ensuring that states are supported to do things like end waiting lists, expand access to critical services to seniors and people with disabilities and continue to maintain support for Medicaid during times of economic downturn. It also means that the federal government can offer incentives for states to change behavior in positive ways – for example, the Money Follows the Person program has helped tens of thousands of people with disabilities escape institutions and nursing homes by offering to pay a 100% match for the cost of their services for their first year in the community.

Unfortunately, Trump’s proposal to block-grant Medicaid would drastically change the nature of the Medicaid program. Instead of states receiving federal funds that match their own commitment, a block grant would lead to states receiving a preset amount of federal funding with no strings attached and no commitment to match additional state investments. This would mean that states would have relatively little incentive to act to cut waiting lists, expand services or maintain their programs when the economy and the state budget was suffering.

According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the block granting proposals included in the House Republican budget would cut Medicaid funding by $1 trillion over the next ten years. By 2026, funding would be at only two-thirds the level anticipated under existing law. As Medicaid represents the primary funder of aging and disability services in the United States, this is yet another example of the devastating impact Donald Trump’s election would have on disability policy.

Donald Trump Wants to Eliminate Critical Privacy Rights for People with Mental Illness

“Finally, we need to reform our mental health programs and institutions in this country. Families, without the ability to get the information needed to help those who are ailing, are too often not given the tools to help their loved ones. There are promising reforms being developed in Congress that should receive bi-partisan support.”

Over the last few years, as gun violence has become more prominent on the national agenda, many in the Republican party have looked for a scapegoat that can move attention away from gun control measures. They’ve found that in people with mental illness. The “promising reforms being developed in Congress” that Trump is referring to is the Murphy bill, H.R. 2646, the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act.

This legislation would significantly limit the HIPAA privacy rights of people with psychiatric disabilities and would incentivize states to expand forced treatment. The bill also includes provisions that would expand institutionalization of people with psychiatric disabilities and make it harder for the federally-funded Protection and Advocacy rights protection program to provide them with legal representation to secure their civil rights. It’s likely that at some point in the general election, Trump will use this as a talking point to show his “support” for helping people with mental illness. It’s important that we not be tricked when he does.

There’s more to be written about this, to be sure. One can only imagine what the Donald would do to Social Security Disability Insurance or the cavalier attitude with which he would treat the educational rights of children with disabilities. But it’s important to start talking about this now, because the longer the race goes on, the longer Trump and his advisors will try and “evolve” him into a candidate that can win the general election. No doubt promises to be a champion for people with disabilities will play a part in that. When those promises come, be ready and be skeptical. Trump will want to buy the right to trample on the rest of America by offering a mess of pottage for the disability community. If we are so foolish as to accept, he will trample on us too.

6 thoughts on “Donald Trump Wants the Disability Vote – Don’t Give it to Him

  1. As part of the “mentally ill vote”, I would like to impress a few things on Mr. Trump. As a constituent with schizo affective disorder and borderline, I rely on state run medical centers for the psychiatry, therapy, and case work to successfully live in mainstream culture-something I have worked very hard to do. I am considered a huge preexisting condition, so many insurances don’t want to cover that hospital stay I may need again at some point in the future. I rely on elected leaders to be compassionate enough to understand how crucial supporting these programs are. With affordable psych visits, I can try to stop a downward spiral before I have to go to a hospital. I can keep my job, my place, my bunny. I can hang out with friends. The meds that are now more affordable for me keep me functioning–and from having to be committed (which really sucks, by the way….,). Please, I beg you… Be compassionate

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  2. I don’t think that Donald Trump should be in office for Presid3nt. He already discriminated against individual with disabilities what’s next he’s going to let the ku Klux Klan wonder the streets killing up African-Americans. We need legislators for individuals with disabilities not legislators to be against individuals with disabilities.

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    1. forced to agree i dont trust his lack of answer when came to autistic people like myself and him having a employment plan for us i mean all he said was im sure you will be happy with my plans on that but sadly i dont trust hillary either i know that statement might make people then ask who do i trust sadly i just feel i cant support anyone given i just feel it a grab for power ask me the US needs to just hit the reset button and try again

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  3. What’s wrong with Ted Cruz? He was a true patriot and could have been a champion for us neurodivergents. I mean, he’s so knowledgeable about our Constitution and he lives by it almost perfectly crisp…

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